Lengthy Appeal Brief Filed in Robin Hood Case

by Ian Freeman
June 19 2014

In late 2013, the people calling themselves the “City of Keene” filed an appeal with the NH supreme court after they lost the Robin Hood cases. Now, six months later, (the wheels of ‘justice’ move slowly) the city’s expensive private attorneys have filed their brief, an appendix, and the NH Municipal Association has weighed in with an “amicus curiae”.courtjester

The NHMA, a group that represents the big-government interests of the various cities and towns in New Hampshire, argues in their 16-page amicus that the superior court erred by dismissing the cases against the Robin Hooders. They say the court did not weigh the “significant governmental interest” in parking enforcement against the right to free speech. In addition, they claim the bureaucrats should be protected from speech they don’t wish to hear and that “reasonable” restrictions can be placed on your free speech, to protect the government agents precious’ ears and egos.

The brief by attorney Charles Bauer filed on behalf of the city is 49 pages and argues that Robin Hooders’ conduct is not protected speech and that their employees will suffer “irreparable harm” if Robin Hooding is allowed to continue. The filing includes basically the same arguments made at superior court, just in appeal form.

The appendix filed by Bauer is 61 pages and contains several filings from the superior court case, for the supreme court’s review.

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